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First aid for baby & child

Created by Lisa in Age: At School, Age: Baby & Toddler, Age: Pre-school, Health and Safety

As all grandparents will know, drugs there is no better cure for little bumps and grazes than a few kisses and cuddles. However, viagra buy when more serious injuries occur it is important that you have the first aid skills and confidence to deal with it. With more grandparents spending time caring for their grandchildren than ever before, physician there has never been a better time to learn some first aid skills.

 

Here are a few tips for some of the more serious first aid scenarios:

 

Choking

How to deal with a choking child is a skill all grandparents should know.

 

For a baby (birth to one):

 

  • If your baby is unable to cough or breathe, lay him face down along your forearm, with his head lower than his bottom. Support his head and shoulders with your hand.
  • Using the heel of your hand, give up to five back blows between his shoulder blades.
  • Turn him face up along your other arm. Pick out any obstruction with your fingertips.
  • If the obstruction has not cleared, give up to five chest thrusts. Place two fingers on the lower half of the baby’s breastbone, pushing inwards and upwards. Then check the baby’s mouth.
  • Give three full cycles of back blows and chest thrusts, checking the mouth after each full cycle.
  • If this does not work call an ambulance and repeat the back blows and abdominal thrusts until help arrives. If the child becomes unconscious, give CPR.

 

For a child (one to puberty):

 

  • If he can’t talk, cough or breathe, help him to bend forwards. Give him up to five back blows between the shoulder blades with the heel of your hand.
  • Check his mouth and remove any object you see.
  • If the obstruction has not cleared, give up to five abdominal thrusts. Place one fist in the middle of his upper abdomen above his belly button and cover your fist with your other hand. Pull sharply inwards and upwards. Check his mouth for dislodged objects.
  • If he is still choking, give three cycles of back blows and abdominal thrusts. Check his mouth after each cycle.
  • If abdominal thrusts fail, call an ambulance and repeat the back blows and abdominal thrusts until help arrives. If he becomes unconscious, give CPR.

 

For more information on choking and to watch our how to video visit: http://childrenfirstaid.redcross.org.uk/choking

 

CPR

Although a rare occurrence, if your grandchild is unconscious and not breathing, CPR is a vital skill that can potentially save their life.

 

For a baby (birth to one)

 

  • Place him on his back on a firm surface. Open his airway by gently tilting back the head and lifting the chin.
  • Give rescue breaths. To do this, place your mouth over his mouth and nose and blow steadily for about one second, until his chest rises. Do this five times.
  • Place two fingers on the centre of his chest and give 30 chest compressions by pressing down firmly, about a third of the depth of his chest.
  • Give two rescue breaths, followed by 30 chest compressions and continue this cycle for about one minute.
  • Call an ambulance and continue the cycle of rescue breaths and chest compressions until help arrives or until the baby starts to breathe again.

 

For a child (one to puberty):


  • Open his airway by gently tilting back the head and lifting the chin.
  • Give rescue breaths. To do this, pinch his nose and give rescue breaths by placing your mouth over his mouth and blow until his chest rises. Repeat five times.
  • Place the heel of your hand in the centre of his chest and lean over him. Give 30 chest compressions by pressing down firmly about a third of the depth of his chest.
  • Give two rescue breaths, followed by 30 chest compressions and follow this cycle for one minute.
  • Call an ambulance and continue the cycle of rescue breaths and chest compressions until help arrives or until he starts to breathe again.

 

For more information on CPR and to watch our how to video visit: http://childrenfirstaid.redcross.org.uk/cpr

 

The recovery position

If you find your grandchild is unconscious but still breathing it is important to place them on their side to allow them to continue breathing. This is sometimes referred to as the recovery position.. By doing this you are preventing them from swallowing their tongue and stopping the airway from  being blocked for instance if they were to be sick.

 

For a baby (birth to one):

 

  • Cradle her in your arms with her head lower than her bottom.
  • Call an ambulance and continue to monitor her breathing until help arrives.

 

For a child (birth to one):

 

  • Kneel beside your child.
  • Bring her furthest arm across her chest and hold her hand against the back of her cheek.
  • Still holding her hand, grab the knee furthest from you and pull up to bend the leg and roll her onto her side.
  • Once on her side, adjust her arm and leg so that she cannot fall forwards.
  • Make sure the airway remains open by tilting her head back and call for an ambulance. Monitor breathing until help arrives.

 

For more information on the recovery position and to watch our how to video visit: http://childrenfirstaid.redcross.org.uk/recoveryposition

 

Burns

Burns and scalds to the skin can be distressing for both you and the child. If your grandchild is injured this way, it is important to stay calm and act as soon as possible to ensure the best outcome:

 

  • Cool the affected area under cold running for at least ten minutes.
  • Once cooled, cover the burn with cling film to protect it from infection.
  • For children and babies that have been burned, always seek medical advice.

 

For more information on burns and to watch our how to video visit: http://childrenfirstaid.redcross.org.uk/burns

 

High temperatures

If your grandchild looks hot and flushed, is sweating and is running a high temperature (over 37°C) there are steps you can take to help them recover. Sometimes extremely high temperatures can cause seizures so it is important to bring down their temperature in the first instance.

 

  • Remove any blankets and clothing and make sure she has plenty of water or diluted fruit juice to drink to cool her down.
  • If she is over 3 months old you can give her some paracetemol-based medicine.
  • If symptoms continue you should seek medical advice or take her to the hospital.

 

For more information on high temperatures and to watch our how to video visit: http://childrenfirstaid.redcross.org.uk/hightemperatures

 

For more in-depth information, British Red Cross Training offers a first aid for child and baby course which covers additional issues such as meningitis, bleeding, drowning, head injuries and seizures. For more information and to book onto a course click here.

 

Visit our competition page to win a free first aid gift card.

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