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Old 06-08-2014, 06:09 PM
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Default Good and Bad fish to eat!

Re: Scallops.

Some species of naturally occurring marine algae (phytoplankton) have the ability to produce toxins that can cause illness. These toxins can accumulate in fish and shellfish that feed on these algae. As large fish eat smaller fish, some of these toxins can accumulate to higher levels in large fish at the top of the food chain. Humans can ingest these naturally occurring toxins by eating shellfish like clams, oysters and mussels, the internal organs of crustaceans like crabs and lobsters, or certain species of fish harvested in areas where toxin producing algae have bloomed.


Risky pollutants in farmed salmon

Persistent organic pollutants have been linked to several diseases, including type 2 diabetes and obesity. And specific types of POPs increase the risk of stroke in women. PCB (one type of POP) levels are five to 10 times higher in farmed fish than in wild fish.

Wild salmon wins here, hands down.

3. Cancer-causing chemicals
Both wild and farmed salmon come with risk if eaten in large quantities. But eaten in moderation, wild salmon is safer.

4. Unsafe contaminants
In recent studies contaminants in farmed salmon were generally higher than in wild salmon. Both wild and farmed salmon contain contaminants, but wild salmon has lower levels and is considered safer overall.

5. Concern about antibiotics
Too much exposure to antibiotics could lead to resistance to their effects. Antibiotic use in farmed fish is said to have been reduced, but it is unclear just how much use is still occurring.

Farmed salmon comes with uncertainty about antibiotic use. Wild salmon does not.

Both farmed and wild salmon have nutrients we all need. But it is becoming clearer that the risks associated with farmed fish are higher than concerns about wild fish. If you want to get the many health benefits fish such as salmon provide, your best bet is to keep it wild.

Many tuna are high in mercury but albacore TUNA—the kind of white tuna that’s commonly canned—gets a thumbs up rating as long as it is “troll- or pole-caught”

The inexpensive SARDINE packs more omega-3s per 3-ounce serving than salmon, tuna or just about any other food; it’s also one of the very few foods that’s naturally high in vitamin D.



Though lake trout are high in contaminants, nearly all the trout you will find in the market is farmed rainbow trout and if farmed in freshwater ponds they are more protected from contaminants.



One type of mackerel called King mackerel contains high amounts of mercury and should not be consumed by pregnant women, nursing women or children. Atlantic and Pacific mackerel are lower in mercury and provide up to 2,100 milligrams of EPA plus DHA per 4-ounce portion.

Herring is a low-mercury fish, high in omega-3s

Pollock is often an ingredient in fish sticks, which are popular among children. Pollock is low in mercury and high in omega-3s.

Haddock is low in mercury and contains beneficial amounts of omega-3s.



AVOID SWORDISH.very high in Mercury, as is shark and marlin.

MODERATE MERCURY

Eat six servings or less per month:
Bass (Striped, Black)
Carp
Cod (Alaskan)*
Halibut (Atlantic)*
Halibut (Pacific)
Monkfish*
Skate*
Snapper*
Tuna (Canned
chunk light)
Tuna (Skipjack)*




LEAST MERCURY

Anchovies
Clam
Crab (Domestic)
Crawfish/Crayfish
Flounder*
Haddock (Atlantic)*
Hake
Herring
Mackerel (N. Atlantic, Chub)
Oyster
Plaice
Pollock
Salmon (Canned)**
Salmon (Fresh)**
Sardine
Scallop*
Shrimp*
Sole (Pacific)
Squid (Calamari)
Trout (Freshwater)
Whitefish
Whiting
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Old 06-08-2014, 10:20 PM
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Good heavens will be all day in the supermarket checking fish out might have to stick with John West !
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Old 07-08-2014, 02:47 AM
Lifer
 
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Well easy for me can only eat Cod, Haddock ,Plaice, Pollock , Salmon , and a little amount of Monkfish
Oh and I found out im ok with Barramunda not sure of spelling with that one
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Old 07-08-2014, 08:31 AM
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Gilly - Many thanks. That's a lot of information, but all very helpful and clarifies the uncertainties. The trouble is you read stuff in the papers and never really know how much it true - or not.

Next - I'd like to get to the truth about chicken contaminants! Surely we have a right to know if the food we are eating is potentially dangerous!
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Old 07-08-2014, 09:59 AM
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Thanks for the information Gilly, I thought all fish was good for you....

I like fish now and again, I am liking the fusions from Birds eye, I guess the sauce isn't good for you.....
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Old 07-08-2014, 12:05 PM
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Thanks for that info Gilly. I have been eating a lot of fish in Cornwall, I love it. Most of the fish here was caught in Newlyn, just down the road but I am presuming that fresh isn't necessarily ok. I am presuming that a concentration of one type of fish might be a problem. I do love salmon, I will check how much the wild costs.
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Old 07-08-2014, 01:25 PM
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Oh gosh, life is fraught with dangers!
Jane
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Old 07-08-2014, 02:22 PM
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Thanks for that info Gilly. I have been eating a lot of fish in Cornwall, I love it. Most of the fish here was caught in Newlyn, just down the road but I am presuming that fresh isn't necessarily ok. I am presuming that a concentration of one type of fish might be a problem. I do love salmon, I will check how much the wild costs.
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Old 07-08-2014, 06:52 PM
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Just posted in same forum re: chicken versus Turkey..as Jean would like to know more and perhaps other ladies would too!

We eat more turkey than chicken here...in fact hardly ever chicken now. Turkey mince can be made into delicious burgers, pies, etc., turkey pieces into lovely casseroles and turkey breasts either eaten whole at dinner or cooked and then put in the fridge and sliced into sandwiches the next day!
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Old 08-08-2014, 09:05 AM
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I think I'll turn Vegetarian .....oh no, wait a minute, who was it who's son said that organic veg is grown in 'sh*t'. Eeeuuw
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